Advanced Forex Price Action Techniques with Andrew Jeken

Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Swaps* (*But Were Afraid To Ask)

Hello, dummies
It's your old pal, Fuzzy.
As I'm sure you've all noticed, a lot of the stuff that gets posted here is - to put it delicately - fucking ridiculous. More backwards-ass shit gets posted to wallstreetbets than you'd see on a Westboro Baptist community message board. I mean, I had a look at the daily thread yesterday and..... yeesh. I know, I know. We all make like the divine Laura Dern circa 1992 on the daily and stick our hands deep into this steaming heap of shit to find the nuggets of valuable and/or hilarious information within (thanks for reading, BTW). I agree. I love it just the way it is too. That's what makes WSB great.
What I'm getting at is that a lot of the stuff that gets posted here - notwithstanding it being funny or interesting - is just... wrong. Like, fucking your cousin wrong. And to be clear, I mean the fucking your *first* cousin kinda wrong, before my Southerners in the back get all het up (simmer down, Billy Ray - I know Mabel's twice removed on your grand-sister's side). Truly, I try to let it slide. I do my bit to try and put you on the right path. Most of the time, I sleep easy no matter how badly I've seen someone explain what a bank liquidity crisis is. But out of all of those tens of thousands of misguided, autistic attempts at understanding the world of high finance, one thing gets so consistently - so *emphatically* - fucked up and misunderstood by you retards that last night I felt obligated at the end of a long work day to pull together this edition of Finance with Fuzzy just for you. It's so serious I'm not even going to make a u/pokimane gag. Have you guessed what it is yet? Here's a clue. It's in the title of the post.
That's right, friends. Today in the neighborhood we're going to talk all about hedging in financial markets - spots, swaps, collars, forwards, CDS, synthetic CDOs, all that fun shit. Don't worry; I'm going to explain what all the scary words mean and how they impact your OTM RH positions along the way.
We're going to break it down like this. (1) "What's a hedge, Fuzzy?" (2) Common Hedging Strategies and (3) All About ISDAs and Credit Default Swaps.
Before we begin. For the nerds and JV traders in the back (and anyone else who needs to hear this up front) - I am simplifying these descriptions for the purposes of this post. I am also obviously not going to try and cover every exotic form of hedge under the sun or give a detailed summation of what caused the financial crisis. If you are interested in something specific ask a question, but don't try and impress me with your Investopedia skills or technical points I didn't cover; I will just be forced to flex my years of IRL experience on you in the comments and you'll look like a big dummy.
TL;DR? Fuck you. There is no TL;DR. You've come this far already. What's a few more paragraphs? Put down the Cheetos and try to concentrate for the next 5-7 minutes. You'll learn something, and I promise I'll be gentle.
Ready? Let's get started.
1. The Tao of Risk: Hedging as a Way of Life
The simplest way to characterize what a hedge 'is' is to imagine every action having a binary outcome. One is bad, one is good. Red lines, green lines; uppie, downie. With me so far? Good. A 'hedge' is simply the employment of a strategy to mitigate the effect of your action having the wrong binary outcome. You wanted X, but you got Z! Frowny face. A hedge strategy introduces a third outcome. If you hedged against the possibility of Z happening, then you can wind up with Y instead. Not as good as X, but not as bad as Z. The technical definition I like to give my idiot juniors is as follows:
Utilization of a defensive strategy to mitigate risk, at a fraction of the cost to capital of the risk itself.
Congratulations. You just finished Hedging 101. "But Fuzzy, that's easy! I just sold a naked call against my 95% OTM put! I'm adequately hedged!". Spoiler alert: you're not (although good work on executing a collar, which I describe below). What I'm talking about here is what would be referred to as a 'perfect hedge'; a binary outcome where downside is totally mitigated by a risk management strategy. That's not how it works IRL. Pay attention; this is the tricky part.
You can't take a single position and conclude that you're adequately hedged because risks are fluid, not static. So you need to constantly adjust your position in order to maximize the value of the hedge and insure your position. You also need to consider exposure to more than one category of risk. There are micro (specific exposure) risks, and macro (trend exposure) risks, and both need to factor into the hedge calculus.
That's why, in the real world, the value of hedging depends entirely on the design of the hedging strategy itself. Here, when we say "value" of the hedge, we're not talking about cash money - we're talking about the intrinsic value of the hedge relative to the the risk profile of your underlying exposure. To achieve this, people hedge dynamically. In wallstreetbets terms, this means that as the value of your position changes, you need to change your hedges too. The idea is to efficiently and continuously distribute and rebalance risk across different states and periods, taking value from states in which the marginal cost of the hedge is low and putting it back into states where marginal cost of the hedge is high, until the shadow value of your underlying exposure is equalized across your positions. The punchline, I guess, is that one static position is a hedge in the same way that the finger paintings you make for your wife's boyfriend are art - it's technically correct, but you're only playing yourself by believing it.
Anyway. Obviously doing this as a small potatoes trader is hard but it's worth taking into account. Enough basic shit. So how does this work in markets?
2. A Hedging Taxonomy
The best place to start here is a practical question. What does a business need to hedge against? Think about the specific risk that an individual business faces. These are legion, so I'm just going to list a few of the key ones that apply to most corporates. (1) You have commodity risk for the shit you buy or the shit you use. (2) You have currency risk for the money you borrow. (3) You have rate risk on the debt you carry. (4) You have offtake risk for the shit you sell. Complicated, right? To help address the many and varied ways that shit can go wrong in a sophisticated market, smart operators like yours truly have devised a whole bundle of different instruments which can help you manage the risk. I might write about some of the more complicated ones in a later post if people are interested (CDO/CLOs, strip/stack hedges and bond swaps with option toggles come to mind) but let's stick to the basics for now.
(i) Swaps
A swap is one of the most common forms of hedge instrument, and they're used by pretty much everyone that can afford them. The language is complicated but the concept isn't, so pay attention and you'll be fine. This is the most important part of this section so it'll be the longest one.
Swaps are derivative contracts with two counterparties (before you ask, you can't trade 'em on an exchange - they're OTC instruments only). They're used to exchange one cash flow for another cash flow of equal expected value; doing this allows you to take speculative positions on certain financial prices or to alter the cash flows of existing assets or liabilities within a business. "Wait, Fuzz; slow down! What do you mean sets of cash flows?". Fear not, little autist. Ol' Fuzz has you covered.
The cash flows I'm talking about are referred to in swap-land as 'legs'. One leg is fixed - a set payment that's the same every time it gets paid - and the other is variable - it fluctuates (typically indexed off the price of the underlying risk that you are speculating on / protecting against). You set it up at the start so that they're notionally equal and the two legs net off; so at open, the swap is a zero NPV instrument. Here's where the fun starts. If the price that you based the variable leg of the swap on changes, the value of the swap will shift; the party on the wrong side of the move ponies up via the variable payment. It's a zero sum game.
I'll give you an example using the most vanilla swap around; an interest rate trade. Here's how it works. You borrow money from a bank, and they charge you a rate of interest. You lock the rate up front, because you're smart like that. But then - quelle surprise! - the rate gets better after you borrow. Now you're bagholding to the tune of, I don't know, 5 bps. Doesn't sound like much but on a billion dollar loan that's a lot of money (a classic example of the kind of 'small, deep hole' that's terrible for profits). Now, if you had a swap contract on the rate before you entered the trade, you're set; if the rate goes down, you get a payment under the swap. If it goes up, whatever payment you're making to the bank is netted off by the fact that you're borrowing at a sub-market rate. Win-win! Or, at least, Lose Less / Lose Less. That's the name of the game in hedging.
There are many different kinds of swaps, some of which are pretty exotic; but they're all different variations on the same theme. If your business has exposure to something which fluctuates in price, you trade swaps to hedge against the fluctuation. The valuation of swaps is also super interesting but I guarantee you that 99% of you won't understand it so I'm not going to try and explain it here although I encourage you to google it if you're interested.
Because they're OTC, none of them are filed publicly. Someeeeeetimes you see an ISDA (dsicussed below) but the confirms themselves (the individual swaps) are not filed. You can usually read about the hedging strategy in a 10-K, though. For what it's worth, most modern credit agreements ban speculative hedging. Top tip: This is occasionally something worth checking in credit agreements when you invest in businesses that are debt issuers - being able to do this increases the risk profile significantly and is particularly important in times of economic volatility (ctrl+f "non-speculative" in the credit agreement to be sure).
(ii) Forwards
A forward is a contract made today for the future delivery of an asset at a pre-agreed price. That's it. "But Fuzzy! That sounds just like a futures contract!". I know. Confusing, right? Just like a futures trade, forwards are generally used in commodity or forex land to protect against price fluctuations. The differences between forwards and futures are small but significant. I'm not going to go into super boring detail because I don't think many of you are commodities traders but it is still an important thing to understand even if you're just an RH jockey, so stick with me.
Just like swaps, forwards are OTC contracts - they're not publicly traded. This is distinct from futures, which are traded on exchanges (see The Ballad Of Big Dick Vick for some more color on this). In a forward, no money changes hands until the maturity date of the contract when delivery and receipt are carried out; price and quantity are locked in from day 1. As you now know having read about BDV, futures are marked to market daily, and normally people close them out with synthetic settlement using an inverse position. They're also liquid, and that makes them easier to unwind or close out in case shit goes sideways.
People use forwards when they absolutely have to get rid of the thing they made (or take delivery of the thing they need). If you're a miner, or a farmer, you use this shit to make sure that at the end of the production cycle, you can get rid of the shit you made (and you won't get fucked by someone taking cash settlement over delivery). If you're a buyer, you use them to guarantee that you'll get whatever the shit is that you'll need at a price agreed in advance. Because they're OTC, you can also exactly tailor them to the requirements of your particular circumstances.
These contracts are incredibly byzantine (and there are even crazier synthetic forwards you can see in money markets for the true degenerate fund managers). In my experience, only Texan oilfield magnates, commodities traders, and the weirdo forex crowd fuck with them. I (i) do not own a 10 gallon hat or a novelty size belt buckle (ii) do not wake up in the middle of the night freaking out about the price of pork fat and (iii) love greenbacks too much to care about other countries' monopoly money, so I don't fuck with them.
(iii) Collars
No, not the kind your wife is encouraging you to wear try out to 'spice things up' in the bedroom during quarantine. Collars are actually the hedging strategy most applicable to WSB. Collars deal with options! Hooray!
To execute a basic collar (also called a wrapper by tea-drinking Brits and people from the Antipodes), you buy an out of the money put while simultaneously writing a covered call on the same equity. The put protects your position against price drops and writing the call produces income that offsets the put premium. Doing this limits your tendies (you can only profit up to the strike price of the call) but also writes down your risk. If you screen large volume trades with a VOL/OI of more than 3 or 4x (and they're not bullshit biotech stocks), you can sometimes see these being constructed in real time as hedge funds protect themselves on their shorts.
(3) All About ISDAs, CDS and Synthetic CDOs
You may have heard about the mythical ISDA. Much like an indenture (discussed in my post on $F), it's a magic legal machine that lets you build swaps via trade confirms with a willing counterparty. They are very complicated legal documents and you need to be a true expert to fuck with them. Fortunately, I am, so I do. They're made of two parts; a Master (which is a form agreement that's always the same) and a Schedule (which amends the Master to include your specific terms). They are also the engine behind just about every major credit crunch of the last 10+ years.
First - a brief explainer. An ISDA is a not in and of itself a hedge - it's an umbrella contract that governs the terms of your swaps, which you use to construct your hedge position. You can trade commodities, forex, rates, whatever, all under the same ISDA.
Let me explain. Remember when we talked about swaps? Right. So. You can trade swaps on just about anything. In the late 90s and early 2000s, people had the smart idea of using other people's debt and or credit ratings as the variable leg of swap documentation. These are called credit default swaps. I was actually starting out at a bank during this time and, I gotta tell you, the only thing I can compare people's enthusiasm for this shit to was that moment in your early teens when you discover jerking off. Except, unlike your bathroom bound shame sessions to Mom's Sears catalogue, every single person you know felt that way too; and they're all doing it at once. It was a fiscal circlejerk of epic proportions, and the financial crisis was the inevitable bukkake finish. WSB autism is absolutely no comparison for the enthusiasm people had during this time for lighting each other's money on fire.
Here's how it works. You pick a company. Any company. Maybe even your own! And then you write a swap. In the swap, you define "Credit Event" with respect to that company's debt as the variable leg . And you write in... whatever you want. A ratings downgrade, default under the docs, failure to meet a leverage ratio or FCCR for a certain testing period... whatever. Now, this started out as a hedge position, just like we discussed above. The purest of intentions, of course. But then people realized - if bad shit happens, you make money. And banks... don't like calling in loans or forcing bankruptcies. Can you smell what the moral hazard is cooking?
Enter synthetic CDOs. CDOs are basically pools of asset backed securities that invest in debt (loans or bonds). They've been around for a minute but they got famous in the 2000s because a shitload of them containing subprime mortgage debt went belly up in 2008. This got a lot of publicity because a lot of sad looking rednecks got foreclosed on and were interviewed on CNBC. "OH!", the people cried. "Look at those big bad bankers buying up subprime loans! They caused this!". Wrong answer, America. The debt wasn't the problem. What a lot of people don't realize is that the real meat of the problem was not in regular way CDOs investing in bundles of shit mortgage debts in synthetic CDOs investing in CDS predicated on that debt. They're synthetic because they don't have a stake in the actual underlying debt; just the instruments riding on the coattails. The reason these are so popular (and remain so) is that smart structured attorneys and bankers like your faithful correspondent realized that an even more profitable and efficient way of building high yield products with limited downside was investing in instruments that profit from failure of debt and in instruments that rely on that debt and then hedging that exposure with other CDS instruments in paired trades, and on and on up the chain. The problem with doing this was that everyone wound up exposed to everybody else's books as a result, and when one went tits up, everybody did. Hence, recession, Basel III, etc. Thanks, Obama.
Heavy investment in CDS can also have a warping effect on the price of debt (something else that happened during the pre-financial crisis years and is starting to happen again now). This happens in three different ways. (1) Investors who previously were long on the debt hedge their position by selling CDS protection on the underlying, putting downward pressure on the debt price. (2) Investors who previously shorted the debt switch to buying CDS protection because the relatively illiquid debt (partic. when its a bond) trades at a discount below par compared to the CDS. The resulting reduction in short selling puts upward pressure on the bond price. (3) The delta in price and actual value of the debt tempts some investors to become NBTs (neg basis traders) who long the debt and purchase CDS protection. If traders can't take leverage, nothing happens to the price of the debt. If basis traders can take leverage (which is nearly always the case because they're holding a hedged position), they can push up or depress the debt price, goosing swap premiums etc. Anyway. Enough technical details.
I could keep going. This is a fascinating topic that is very poorly understood and explained, mainly because the people that caused it all still work on the street and use the same tactics today (it's also terribly taught at business schools because none of the teachers were actually around to see how this played out live). But it relates to the topic of today's lesson, so I thought I'd include it here.
Work depending, I'll be back next week with a covenant breakdown. Most upvoted ticker gets the post.
*EDIT 1\* In a total blowout, $PLAY won. So it's D&B time next week. Post will drop Monday at market open.
submitted by fuzzyblankeet to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

Trump Didn’t Kill the Global Trade System. He Split It in Two.

This article is taken from the Wall Street Journal written about nine months ago and sits behind a a paywall, so I decided to copy and paste it here. This article explains Trump's policies toward global trade and what has actually happened so far. I think the article does a decent job of explaining the Trade War. While alot has happenedsince the article was written, I still think its relevant.
However, what is lacking in the article, like many articles on the trade war, is it doesn't really explain the history of US trade policy, the laws that the US administration is using to place tariffs on China and the official justification for the US President in enacting tariffs against China. In my analysis I will cover those points.

SUMMARY

When Trump entered the White House people feared he would dismantle the global system the US and its allies had built over the last 75 years, but he hasn't. He has realign into two systems. One between the US and its allies which looks similar to the one built since the 1980s with a few of quota and tariffs. As the article points out
Today, Korus and Nafta have been replaced by updated agreements(one not yet ratified) that look much like the originals. South Korea accepted quotas on steel. Mexico and Canada agreed to higher wages, North American content requirements and quotas for autos. Furthermore, the article points out Douglas Irwin, an economist and trade historian at Dartmouth College, calls these results the “status quo with Trumpian tweaks: a little more managed trade sprinkled about for favored industries. It’s not good, but it’s not the destruction of the system.” Mr. Trump’s actions so far affect only 12% of U.S. imports, according to Chad Bown of the Peterson Institute for International Economics. In 1984, 21% of imports were covered by similar restraints, many imposed by Mr. Reagan, such as on cars, steel, motorcycles and clothing. Protectionist instincts go so far in the US, there are strong lobby groups for both protectionist and freetrade in the US.
The second reflects a emerging rivalry between the US and China. Undo some of the integration that followed China accession to the WTO. Two questions 1) How far is the US willing to decouple with China 2) Can it persuade allies to join.
The second is going to be difficult because China's economic ties are greater than they were between the Soviets, and China isn't waging an ideological struggle. Trump lacks Reagan commitment to alliance and free trade. The status quo with China is crumbling Dan Sullivan, a Republican senator from Alaska, personifies these broader forces reshaping the U.S. approach to the world. When Mr. Xi visited the U.S. in 2015, Mr. Sullivan urged his colleagues to pay more attention to China’s rise. On the Senate floor, he quoted the political scientist Graham Allison: “War between the U.S. and China is more likely than recognized at the moment.” Last spring, Mr. Sullivan went to China and met officials including Vice President Wang Qishan. They seemed to think tensions with the U.S. will fade after Mr. Trump leaves the scene, Mr. Sullivan recalled. “I just said, ‘You are completely misreading this.’” The mistrust, he told them, is bipartisan, and will outlast Mr. Trump. both Bush II and Obama tried to change dialogue and engagement, but by the end of his term, Obama was questioning the approach. Trump has declared engagement. “We don’t like it when our allies steal our ideas either, but it’s a much less dangerous situation,” said Derek Scissors, a China expert at the American Enterprise Institute whose views align with the administration’s more hawkish officials. “We’re not worried about the war-fighting capability of Japan and Korea because they’re our friends.”
The article also points out unlike George Kennan in 1946 who made a case for containing the Soviet Union, the US hasn't explicitly made a case for containing the Soviets, Trump's administration hasn't, because as the the article explains its divided Michael Pillsbury a Hudson Institute scholar close to the Trump team, see 3 scenarios
Pillsbury thinks the third is most likely to happen, even though the administration hasn't said that it has adopted that policy. The US is stepping efforts to draw in other trading partners. The US, EU and Japan have launched a WTO effort to crack down on domestic subsidies and technology transfers requirement. US and Domestic concerns with prompted some countries to restrict Huawei. The US is also seeking to walloff China from other trade deals. However, there are risk with this strategy

ARTICLE

Trump Didn’t Kill the Global Trade System. He Split It in Two.

INTRODUCTION

My main criticism of this article is it tries like the vast majority of articles to fit US trade actions in the larger context of US geopolitical strategy. Even the author isn't certain "The first goes to the heart of Mr. Trump’s goal. If his aim is to hold back China’s advance, economists predict he will fail.". If you try to treat the trade "war" and US geopolitical strategy toward China as one, you will find yourself quickly frustrated and confused. If you treat them separately with their different set of stakeholders and histories, were they intersect with regards to China, but diverge. During the Cold War, trade policy toward the Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc was subordinated to geopolitical concerns. For Trump, the trade issues are more important than geopolitical strategy. His protectionist trade rhetoric has been fairly consistent since 1980s. In his administration, the top cabinet members holding economic portfolios, those of Commerce, Treasury and US Trade Representative are the same people he picked when he first took office. The Director of the Economic Council has changed hands once, its role isn't as important as the National Security Advisor. While State, Defense, CIA, Homeland Security, UN Ambassador, National Security Advisor have changed hands at least once. Only the Director of National Intelligence hasn't changed.
International Trade makes up 1/4 of the US economy, and like national security its primarily the responsibility of the Federal government. States in the US don't implement their own tariffs. If you add the impact of Treasury policy and how it relates to capital flows in and out of the US, the amounts easily exceed the size of the US economy. Furthermore, because of US Dollar role as the reserve currency and US control of over global system the impact of Treasury are global. Trade policy and investment flows runs through two federal departments Commerce and Treasury and for trade also USTR. Defense spending makes up 3.3% of GDP, and if you add in related homeland security its at most 4%. Why would anyone assume that these two realms be integrated let alone trade policy subordinate to whims of a national security bureaucracy in most instances? With North Korea or Iran, trade and investment subordinate themselves to national security, because to Treasury and Commerce bureaucrats and their affiliated interest groups, Iran and the DPRK are well, economic midgets, but China is a different matter.
The analysis will be divided into four sections. The first will be to provide a brief overview of US trade policy since 1914. The second section will discuss why the US is going after China on trade issues, and why the US has resorted using a bilateral approach as opposed to going through the WTO. The third section we will talk about how relations with China is hashed out in the US.
The reason why I submitted this article, because there aren't many post trying to explain US-China Trade War from a trade perspective. Here is a post titled "What is the Reasons for America's Trade War with China, and not one person mentioned Article 301 or China's WTO Commitments. You get numerous post saying that Huawei is at heart of the trade war. Its fine, but if you don't know what was inside the USTR Investigative report that lead to the tariffs. its like skipping dinner and only having dessert When the US President, Donald J Trump, says he wants to negotiate a better trade deal with other countries, and has been going on about for the last 35 years, longer than many of you have been alive, why do people think that the key issues with China aren't primarily about trade at the moment.

OVERVIEW OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE ORIENTATION

Before 1940s, the US could be categorized as a free market protectionist economy. For many this may seem like oxymoron, how can an economy be free market and protectionist? In 1913, government spending made up about 7.5% of US GDP, in the UK it was 13%, and for Germany 18% (Public Spending in the 20th Century A Global Perspective: Ludger Schuknecht and Vito Tanzi - 2000). UK had virtual zero tariffs, while for manufactured goods in France it was 20%, 13% Germany, 9% Belgium and 4% Netherlands. For raw materials and agricultural products, it was almost zero. In contrast, for the likes of United States, Russia and Japan it was 44%, 84% and 30% respectively. Even though in 1900 United States was an economic powerhouse along with Germany, manufactured exports only made up 30% of exports, and the US government saw tariffs as exclusively a domestic policy matter and didn't see tariffs as something to be negotiated with other nations. The US didn't have the large constituency to push the government for lower tariffs abroad for their exports like in Britain in the 1830-40s (Reluctant Partners: A History of Multilateral Trade Cooperation, 1850-2000).
The Underwood Tariffs Act of 1913 which legislated the income tax, dropped the tariffs to 1850 levels levels.Until 16th amendment was ratified in 1913 making income tax legal, all US federal revenue came from excise and tariffs. In contrast before 1914, about 50% of UK revenue came from income taxes. The reason for US reluctance to introduced income tax was ideological and the United State's relative weak government compared to those in Europe. After the First World War, the US introduced the Emergency Tariff Act of 1921, than the Fordney–McCumber Tariff of 1922 followed by a Smoot-Hawley Act of 1930. Contrary to popular opinion, the Smoot-Hawley Act of 1930 had a small negative impact on the economy, since imports and exports played a small part of the US economy, and the tariffs were lower than the average that existed from 1850-1914.
Immediately after the Second World War, when the US economy was the only industrialized economy left standing, the economic focus was on rehabilitation and monetary stability. There was no grandiose and ideological design. Bretton Woods system linked the US dollar to gold to create monetary stability, and to avoid competitive devaluation and tariffs that plagued the world economy after Britain took itself off the gold in 1931. The US$ was the natural choice, because in 1944 2/3 of the world's gold was in the US. One reason why the Marshall Plan was created was to alleviate the chronic deficits Europeans countries had with the US between 1945-50. It was to rebuild their economies so they could start exports good to the US. Even before it was full implemented in 1959, it was already facing problems, the trade surpluses that the US was running in the 1940s, turned to deficits as European and Japanese economies recovered. By 1959, Federal Reserves foreign liabilities had already exceeded its gold reserves. There were fears of a run on the US gold supply and arbitrage. A secondary policy of the Bretton woods system was curbs on capital outflows to reduce speculation on currency pegs, and this had a negative impact on foreign investment until it was abandoned in 1971. It wasn't until the 1980s, where foreign investment recovered to levels prior to 1914. Factoring out the big spike in global oil prices as a result of the OPEC cartel, it most likely wasn't until the mid-1990s that exports as a % of GDP had reached 1914 levels.
Until the 1980s, the US record regarding free trade and markets was mediocre. The impetus to remove trade barriers in Europe after the Second World War was driven by the Europeans themselves. The EEC already had a custom union in 1968, Canada and the US have yet to even discuss implementing one. Even with Canada it took the US over 50 years to get a Free Trade Agreement. NAFTA was inspired by the success of the EEC. NAFTA was very much an elite driven project. If the Americans put the NAFTA to a referendum like the British did with the EEC in the seventies, it most likely wouldn't pass. People often look at segregation in the US South as a political issue, but it was economic issue as well. How could the US preach free trade, when it didn't have free trade in its own country. Segregation was a internal non-tariff barrier. In the first election after the end of the Cold War in 1992, Ross Perot' based most of independent run for the Presidency on opposition to NAFTA. He won 19% of the vote. Like Ross Perot before him, Donald Trump is not the exception in how America has handled tariffs since the founding of the Republic, but more the norm.
The embrace of free trade by the business and political elite can be attributed to two events. After the end of Bretton Woods in 1971, a strong vested interest in the US in the form of multinationals and Wall Street emerged advocating for removal of tariffs and more importantly the removal of restrictions on free flow of capital, whether direct foreign investment in portfolio investment. However, the political class embrace of free trade and capital only really took off after the collapse of the Soviet Union propelled by Cold War triumphalism.
As mentioned by the article, the US is reverting back to a pre-WTO relations with China. As Robert Lighthizer said in speech in 2000
I guess my prescription, really, is to move back to more of a negotiating kind of a settlement. Return to WTO and what it really was meant to be. Something where you have somebody make a decision but have it not be binding.
The US is using financial and legal instruments developed during the Cold War like its extradition treaties (with Canada and Europe), and Section 301. Here is a very good recent article about enforcement commitment that China will make.‘Painful’ enforcement ahead for China if trade war deal is reached with US insisting on unilateral terms
NOTE: It is very difficult to talk about US-China trade war without a basic knowledge of global economic history since 1914. What a lot of people do is politicize or subordinate the economic history to the political. Some commentators think US power was just handed to them after the Second World War, when the US was the only industrialized economy left standing. The dominant position of the US was temporary and in reality its like having 10 tonnes of Gold sitting in your house, it doesn't automatically translate to influence. The US from 1945-1989 was slowly and gradually build her influence in the non-Communist world. For example, US influence in Canada in the 1960s wasn't as strong as it is now. Only 50% of Canadian exports went to the US in 1960s vs 80% at the present moment.

BASIS OF THE US TRADE DISCUSSION WITH CHINA

According to preliminary agreement between China and the US based on unnamed sources in the Wall Street Journal article US, China close in on Trade Deal. In this article it divides the deal in two sections. The first aspects have largely to do with deficits and is political.
As part of a deal, China is pledging to help level the playing field, including speeding up the timetable for removing foreign-ownership limitations on car ventures and reducing tariffs on imported vehicles to below the current auto tariff of 15%. Beijing would also step up purchases of U.S. goods—a tactic designed to appeal to President Trump, who campaigned on closing the bilateral trade deficit with China. One of the sweeteners would be an $18 billion natural-gas purchase from Cheniere Energy Inc., people familiar with the transaction said.
The second part will involve the following.
  1. Commitment Regarding Industrial Policy
  2. Provisions to protect IP
  3. Mechanism which complaints by US companies can be addressed
  4. Bilateral meetings adjudicate disputes. If talks don't produce agreement than US can raise tariffs unilaterally
This grouping of conditions is similar to the points filled under the 301 investigation which serve the basis for initiating the tariffs. I have been reading some sources that say this discussion on this second group of broader issues could only be finalized later
The official justifications for placing the tariffs on Chinese goods is found under the March 2018 investigation submitted by the office of the President to Congress titled FINDINGS OF THE INVESTIGATION INTO CHINA’S ACTS, POLICIES, AND PRACTICES RELATED TO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, AND INNOVATION UNDER SECTION 301 OF THE TRADE ACT OF 1974. From this investigation the United States Trade Representative (USTR) place US Tariffs on Chinese goods as per Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974. Here is a press release by the USTR listing the reasons for placing tariffs, and the key section from the press release. Specifically, the Section 301 investigation revealed:
In the bigger context of trade relations between US and China, China is not honoring its WTO commitments, and the USTR issued its yearly report to Congress in early February about the status of China compliance with its WTO commitments. The points that served as a basis for applying Section 301, also deviate from her commitments as Clinton's Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky paving the way for a trade war. Barshefsky argues that China's back sliding was happening as early as 2006-07, and believes the trade war could have been avoided has those commitments been enforced by previous administrations.
I will provide a brief overview of WTO membership and China's process of getting into the WTO.
WTO members can be divided into two groups, first are countries that joined in 1995-97, and were members of GATT, than there are the second group that joined after 1997. China joined in 2001. There is an argument that when China joined in 2001, she faced more stringent conditions than other developing countries that joined before, because the vast majority of developing countries were members of GATT, and were admitted to the WTO based on that previous membership in GATT. Here is Brookings Institute article published in 2001 titled "Issues in China’s WTO Accession"
This question is all the more puzzling because the scope and depth of demands placed on entrants into the formal international trading system have increased substantially since the formal conclusion of the Uruguay Round of trade negotiations in 1994, which expanded the agenda considerably by covering many services, agriculture, intellectual property, and certain aspects of foreign direct investment. Since 1994, the international community has added agreements covering information technology, basic telecommunications services, and financial services. WTO membership now entails liberalization of a much broader range of domestic economic activity, including areas that traditionally have been regarded by most countries as among the most sensitive, than was required of countries entering the WTO’s predecessor organization the GATT.
The terms of China’s protocol of accession to the World Trade Organization reflect the developments just described and more. China’s market access commitments are much more far-reaching than those that governed the accession of countries only a decade ago. And, as a condition for membership, China was required to make protocol commitments that substantially exceed those made by any other member of the World Trade Organization, including those that have joined since 1995. The broader and deeper commitments China has made inevitably will entail substantial short-term economic costs.
What are the WTO commitments Barshefsky goes on about? When countries join the WTO, particularly those countries that weren't members of GATT and joined after 1997, they have to work toward fulfilling certain commitments. There are 4 key documents when countries make an accession to WTO membership, the working party report, the accession protocol paper, the goods schedule and service schedule.
In the working party report as part of the conclusion which specifies the commitment of each member country what they will do in areas that aren't compliant with WTO regulations on the date they joined. The problem there is no good enforcement mechanism for other members to force China to comply with these commitments. And WTO punishments are weak.
Here is the commitment paragraph for China
"The Working Party took note of the explanations and statements of China concerning its foreign trade regime, as reflected in this Report. The Working Party took note of the commitments given by China in relation to certain specific matters which are reproduced in paragraphs 18-19, 22-23, 35-36, 40, 42, 46-47, 49, 60, 62, 64, 68, 70, 73, 75, 78-79, 83-84, 86, 91-93, 96, 100-103, 107, 111, 115-117, 119-120, 122-123, 126-132, 136, 138, 140, 143, 145, 146, 148, 152, 154, 157, 162, 165, 167-168, 170-174, 177-178, 180, 182, 184-185, 187, 190-197, 199-200, 203-207, 210, 212-213, 215, 217, 222-223, 225, 227-228, 231-235, 238, 240-242, 252, 256, 259, 263, 265, 270, 275, 284, 286, 288, 291, 292, 296, 299, 302, 304-305, 307-310, 312-318, 320, 322, 331-334, 336, 339 and 341 of this Report and noted that these commitments are incorporated in paragraph 1.2 of the Draft Protocol. "
This is a tool by the WTO that list all the WTO commitment of each country in the working paper. In the goods and service schedule they have commitments for particular sectors. Here is the a press release by the WTO in September 2001, after successfully concluding talks for accession, and brief summary of key areas in which China hasn't fulfilled her commitments. Most of the commitments made by China were made to address its legacy as a non-market economy and involvement of state owned enterprises. In my opinion, I think the US government and investors grew increasingly frustrated with China, after 2007 not just because of China's back sliding, but relative to other countries who joined after 1997 like Vietnam, another non-market Leninist dictatorship. When comparing China's commitments to the WTO its best to compare her progress with those that joined after 1997, which were mostly ex-Soviet Republics.
NOTE: The Chinese media have for two decades compared any time the US has talked about China's currency manipulation or any other issue as a pretext for imposing tariffs on China to the Plaza Accords. I am very sure people will raise it here. My criticism of this view is fourfold. First, the US targeted not just Japan, but France, Britain and the UK as well. Secondly, the causes of the Japan lost decade were due largely to internal factors. Thirdly, Japan, UK, Britain and France in the 1980s, the Yuan isn't undervalued today. Lastly, in the USTR investigation, its China's practices that are the concern, not so much the trade deficit.

REASONS FOR TRUMPS UNILATERAL APPROACH

I feel that people shouldn't dismiss Trump's unilateral approach toward China for several reasons.
  1. The multilateral approach won't work in many issues such as the trade deficit, commercial espionage and intellectual property, because US and her allies have different interest with regard to these issues. Germany and Japan and trade surpluses with China, while the US runs a deficit. In order to reach a consensus means the West has to compromise among themselves, and the end result if the type of toothless resolutions you commonly find in ASEAN regarding the SCS. Does America want to "compromise" its interest to appease a politician like Justin Trudeau? Not to mention opposition from domestic interest. TPP was opposed by both Clinton and Trump during the election.
  2. You can't launch a geopolitical front against China using a newly formed trade block like the TPP. Some of the existing TPP members are in economic groups with China, like Malaysia and Australia.
  3. China has joined a multitude of international bodies, and at least in trade, these bodies haven't changed its behavior.
  4. Dealing with China, its a no win situation whether you use a tough multilateral / unilateral approach. If the US endorse a tough unilateral approach gives the impression that the US is acting like the British during the Opium War. If you take a concerted Western approach you are accused of acting like the 8 Powers Alliance in 1900.
  5. Trump was elected to deal with China which he and his supporters believe was responsible for the loss of millions manufacturing jobs when China joined the WTO in 2001. It is estimate the US lost 6 Million jobs, about 1/4 of US manufacturing Jobs. This has been subsequently advanced by some economists. The ball got rolling when Bill Clinton decided to grant China Most Favored Nation status in 1999, just a decade after Tiananmen.
  6. China hasn't dealt with issues like IP protection, market access, subsidies to state own companies and state funded industrial spying.
To his credit, Trump has said his aim was not to overthrow authoritarian governments, and that even applies to the likes of Iran. The Arab spring scared Russia and China, because the US for a brief moment placed the spread of democracy over its security interest.

UNDERSTANDING HOW THE US MAKES DECISIONS REGARDING CHINA

At this moment, China or the trade war isn't an area of great concern for the American public, among international issues it ranks lower than international terrorism, North Korea and Iran's nuclear program.
According to the survey, 39 percent of the country views China’s growing power as a “critical threat” to Americans. That ranked it only eighth among 12 potential threats listed and placed China well behind the perceived threats from international terrorism (66 percent), North Korea’s nuclear program (59 percent) and Iran’s nuclear program (52 percent). It’s also considerably lower than when the same question was asked during the 1990s, when more than half of those polled listed China as a critical threat. That broadly tracks with a recent poll from the Pew Research Center that found concern about U.S.-China economic issues had decreased since 2012.
In looking at how US conducts relations foreign policy with China, we should look at it from the three areas of most concern - economic, national security and ideology. Each sphere has their interest groups, and sometimes groups can occupy two spheres at once. Security experts are concerned with some aspects of China's economic actions like IP theft and industrial policy (China 2025), because they are related to security. In these sphere there are your hawks and dove. And each sphere is dominated by certain interest groups. That is why US policy toward China can often appear contradictory. You have Trump want to reduce the trade deficit, but security experts advocating for restrictions on dual use technology who are buttressed by people who want export restrictions on China, as a way of getting market access.
Right now the economic concerns are most dominant, and the hawks seem to dominate. The economic hawks traditionally have been domestic manufacturing companies and economic nationalist. In reality the hawks aren't dominant, but the groups like US Companies with large investment in China and Wall Street are no longer defending China, and some have turned hawkish against China. These US companies are the main conduit in which China's lobby Congress, since China only spends 50% of what Taiwan spends lobbying Congress.
THE ANGLO SAXON WORLD AND CHINA
I don't think many Chinese even those that speak English, have a good understanding Anglo-Saxon society mindset. Anglo Saxons countries, whether US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Ireland are commerce driven society governed by sanctity of contracts. The English great philosophical contributions to Western philosophy have primarily to do with economics and politics like Adam Smith, John Locke, David Hume and Thomas Hobbes. This contrast with the French and Germans. Politics in the UK and to a lesser extent the US, is centered around economics, while in Mainland Europe its religion. When the Americans revolted against the British Empire in 1776, the initial source of the grievances were taxes.
Outside of East Asia, the rest of the World's relationship with China was largely commercial, and for United States, being an Anglosaxon country, even more so. In Southeast Asia, Chinese aren't known for high culture, but for trade and commerce. Outside Vietnam, most of Chinese loans words in Southeast Asian languages involve either food or money. The influence is akin to Yiddish in English.
Some people point to the Mao and Nixon meeting as great strategic breakthrough and symbol of what great power politics should look like. The reality is that the Mao-Nixon meeting was an anomaly in the long history of relations with China and the West. Much of China-Western relations over the last 500 years was conducted by multitudes of nameless Chinese and Western traders. The period from 1949-1979 was the only period were strategic concerns triumphed trade, because China had little to offer except instability and revolution. Even in this period, China's attempt to spread revolution in Southeast Asia was a threat to Western investments and corporate interest in the region. During the nadir of both the Qing Dynasty and Republican period, China was still engaged in its traditional commercial role. Throughout much of history of their relations with China, the goals of Britain and the United States were primarily economic,
IMAGINE JUST 10% OF CHINA BOUGHT MY PRODUCT
From the beginning, the allure of China to Western businesses and traders has been its sheer size I. One of the points that the USTR mentions is lack of market access for US companies operating in China, while Chinese companies face much less restrictions operating in the US.
This is supported by remarks by Henry Paulson and Charlene Barshefsky. As Paulson remarked
Trade with China has hurt some American workers. And they have expressed their grievances at the ballot box.
So while many attribute this shift to the Trump Administration, I do not. What we are now seeing will likely endure for some time within the American policy establishment. China is viewed—by a growing consensus—not just as a strategic challenge to the United States but as a country whose rise has come at America’s expense. In this environment, it would be helpful if the US-China relationship had more advocates. That it does not reflects another failure:
In large part because China has been slow to open its economy since it joined the WTO, the American business community has turned from advocate to skeptic and even opponent of past US policies toward China. American business doesn’t want a tariff war but it does want a more aggressive approach from our government. How can it be that those who know China best, work there, do business there, make money there, and have advocated for productive relations in the past, are among those now arguing for more confrontation? The answer lies in the story of stalled competition policy, and the slow pace of opening, over nearly two decades. This has discouraged and fragmented the American business community. And it has reinforced the negative attitudinal shift among our political and expert classes. In short, even though many American businesses continue to prosper in China, a growing number of firms have given up hope that the playing field will ever be level. Some have accepted the Faustian bargain of maximizing today’s earnings per share while operating under restrictions that jeopardize their future competitiveness. But that doesn’t mean they’re happy about it. Nor does it mean they aren’t acutely aware of the risks — or thinking harder than ever before about how to diversify their risks away from, and beyond, China.
What is interesting about Paulson's speech is he spend only one sentence about displaced US workers, and a whole paragraph about US business operating in China. While Kissinger writes books about China, how much does he contribute to both Democrats and the Republicans during the election cycle? China is increasingly makING it more difficult for US companies operating and those exporting products to China.

CONTINUED

submitted by weilim to IntlScholars [link] [comments]

List of useful option trader resources available on the r/options newby thread

These are the standard weekly list of links on the options weekly newby safe haven post.
Posting here for greater visibility and understanding, and inviting comments for improvement.
All suggestions for improvement, or pointing out errors, or commendations are welcome via this post here, or also via a direct message (DM) to redtexture, the usual moderator and weekly poster to the options newby safe haven thread.
Thanks in advance to all and any comments.
Key informational links: • Glossary • List of Recommended Books • Introduction to Options (The Options Playbook) • The complete side-bar informational links, for mobile app users.

Links to the most frequent answers

I just made (or lost) $____. Should I close the trade? Yes, close the trade, because you had no plan for an exit to limit your risk. Your trade is a prediction: a plan directs action upon an (in)validated prediction. Take the gain (or loss). End the risk of losing the gain (or increasing the loss). Plan the exit before the start of each trade, for both a gain, and maximum loss. • Exit-first trade planning, and using a risk-reduction trade checklist (Redtexture)
Why did my options lose value, when the stock price went in a favorable direction? • Options extrinsic and intrinsic value, an introduction (Redtexture)
Getting started in options • Calls and puts, long and short, an introduction (Redtexture) • Exercise & Assignment - A Guide (ScottishTrader) • Some useful educational links • Some introductory trading guidance, with educational links • Options Expiration & Assignment (Option Alpha) • Expiration time and date (Investopedia)
Common mistakes and useful advice for new options traders • Five mistakes to avoid when trading options (Options Playbook) • Top 10 Mistakes Beginner Option Traders Make (Ally Bank) • One year into options trading: lessons learned (whitethunder9) • Here's some cold hard words from a professional trader (magik_moose) • Thoughts after trading for 7 Years (invcht2) • Avoiding Stupidity is Easier than Seeking Brilliance (Farnum Street Blog) • 20 Habits of Highly Successful Traders (Viper Report) (40 minutes) • There's a bull market somewhere (Jason Leavitt) (3 minutes)
Trade planning, risk reduction and trade size, etc. • Exit-first trade planning, and using a risk-reduction trade checklist (Redtexture) • Trade Checklists and Guides (Option Alpha) • An illustration of planning on trades failing. (John Carter) (at 90 seconds) • Trade Simulator Tool (Radioactive Trading) • Risk of Ruin (Better System Trader)
Minimizing Bid-Ask Spreads (high-volume options are best) • Fishing for a price: price discovery with (wide) bid-ask spreads (Redtexture) • List of option activity by underlying (Market Chameleon) • List of option activity by underlying (Barchart)
Closing out a trade • Most options positions are closed before expiration (Options Playbook) • When to Exit Guide (Option Alpha) • Risk to reward ratios change over the life of a position: a reason for early exit (Redtexture)
Options Greeks and Option Chains • An Introduction to Options Greeks (Options Playbook) • Options Greeks (Epsilon Options) • Theta Decay: The Ultimate Guide (Chris Butler - Project Option) • Theta decay rates differ: At the money vs. away from the money • Theta: A Detailed Look at the Decay of Option Time Value (James Toll) • Gamma Risk Explained - (Gavin McMaster - Options Trading IQ) • How Often Within Expected Move? Data Science and Implied Volatility (Michael Rechenthin, PhD - TastyTrade 2017) • A selected list of option chain & option data websites
Selected Trade Positions & Management • The Wheel Strategy (ScottishTrader) • Rolling Short (Credit) Spreads (Options Playbook) • Synthetic option positions: Why and how they are used (Fidelity) • Covered Calls Tutorial (Option Investor) • Take the loss (here's why) (Clay Trader) (15 minutes) • The diagonal calendar spread and "poor man's covered call" (Redtexture) • Creative Ways to Avoid The Pattern Day Trader Rule (Sean McLaughlin) • Options and Dividend Risk (Sage Anderson, TastyTrade) • Options contract adjustments: what you should know (Fidelity) • Options contract adjustment announcements / memoranda (Options Clearing Corporation)
Implied Volatility, IV Rank, and IV Percentile (of days) • An introduction to Implied Volatility (Khan Academy) • An introduction to Black Scholes formula (Khan Academy) • IV Rank vs. IV Percentile: Which is better? (Project Option) • IV Rank vs. IV Percentile in Trading (Tasty Trade) (video)
Miscellaneous: Economic Calendars, International Brokers, RobinHood, Pattern Day Trader, CBOE Exchange Rules, Contract Specifications, TDA Margin Handbook, EU Regulations on US ETFs, US Taxes and Options • Selected calendars of economic reports and events • An incomplete list of international brokers dealing in US options markets (Redtexture) • Free brokerages can be very costly: Why option traders should not use RobinHood • Pattern Day Trader status and $25,000 margin account balances (FINRA) • How to find out when a new expiration is opening up: email: [email protected] for the status of a particular ticker's new expirations. • CBOE Exchange Rules (770+ pages, PDF) • CBOE Contract Specications and Trading Days & Hours • TDAmeritrade Margin Handbook (18 pages PDF) • Monthly expirations of Index options are settled on next day prices • PRIIPS, KIPs, EU regulations, ETFs, Options, Brokers • Key Information Documents (KIDs) for European Citizens (Options Clearing Corporation) • Taxes and Investing (Options Industry Council) (PDF)
submitted by redtexture to options [link] [comments]

ForexBit Review

Overview:

The name of this broker ForexBit suggests that the broker deals with the exchange of Forex, Cryptos and provides Contracts-for-Difference. The broker does not mention any account types on its website but shows some investment plans. The plans offered show growth in investments on an hourly basis. The website looks attractive but also seems misguiding. This ForexBit review will shed light on the characteristics and offerings of this broker. Don’t forget to follow this review completely for the sake of your investments.

About ForexBit:

The broker ForexBit offers trade-in FX and binary options. The assets provided by them are very broad. The assets consist of cryptos, indexes, lots of commodities, shares, bonds, and futures. The crypto-coin portfolio of this broker is also very wide and contains all major cryptos like Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple, Litecoin, Dash, and minor ones like IOTA, ZCash, Ada, NEO, Bitcoin Cash, Stellar Lumens, and several others. The official website claims that potential customers of ForexBit are provided with MetaTrader5 trading platform.
The domain of this broker does not furnish information about its owner or manager. But interestingly it provides a company number on the top side of the website. When clicked on it, it redirects to a pdf file that mentions the owner's name and other details. The name of the owner turns out to be Donald Brian and a UK based address. Not surprisingly enough, such documentation and information must be treated as scam and misleading. No genuine broker has such a witty information system. Furthermore, the Financial Conduct Authority in the UK has blacklisted this shady broker on its website. So, it is clear that the broker ForexBit is unlicensed and unregulated. And its potential clients are prone to scam and their funds are not in the safe hands.
The initial investment required starts from $20 to $2500 according to the plans. The level 1 plan offers a 10% growth in 8 hours with a referral of 5%. The level 2 plan offers a 15% growth in 8 hours with a referral of 5%. The level 3 plan offers a 30% growth in 7 hours with a referral of 7%. And the advance plan offers a 55% growth in investment in just 4 hours with a referral of 8%. But the question of how ForexBit will achieve such high profit in such a less time is unanswered.

Is ForexBit scam or legit?

The answer to this question is straight forward, the broker ForexBit is a scam. The information provided on the website does not fulfill any trading criteria. It only asks for the investments. Furthermore, the great strategy for gaining such a huge profit in very less time is also not mentioned anywhere. The provided information on its owner is as shady as it gets. The referral system present makes it clear that the broker is not genuine and trying to make money merely by trader's investments and their referrals. Stay away from this cryptocurrency scam.
submitted by fraudbrokers to u/fraudbrokers [link] [comments]

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submitted by tranlinhphuong1 to InfinityScalperReview [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: cs7646_fall2017 top posts from 2017-08-23 to 2017-12-10 22:43 PDT

Period: 108.98 days
Submissions Comments
Total 999 10425
Rate (per day) 9.17 95.73
Unique Redditors 361 695
Combined Score 4162 17424

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 296 points, 24 submissions: tuckerbalch
    1. Project 2 Megathread (optimize_something) (33 points, 475 comments)
    2. project 3 megathread (assess_learners) (27 points, 1130 comments)
    3. For online students: Participation check #2 (23 points, 47 comments)
    4. ML / Data Scientist internship and full time job opportunities (20 points, 36 comments)
    5. Advance information on Project 3 (19 points, 22 comments)
    6. participation check #3 (19 points, 29 comments)
    7. manual_strategy project megathread (17 points, 825 comments)
    8. project 4 megathread (defeat_learners) (15 points, 209 comments)
    9. project 5 megathread (marketsim) (15 points, 484 comments)
    10. QLearning Robot project megathread (12 points, 691 comments)
  2. 278 points, 17 submissions: davebyrd
    1. A little more on Pandas indexing/slicing ([] vs ix vs iloc vs loc) and numpy shapes (37 points, 10 comments)
    2. Project 1 Megathread (assess_portfolio) (34 points, 466 comments)
    3. marketsim grades are up (25 points, 28 comments)
    4. Midterm stats (24 points, 32 comments)
    5. Welcome to CS 7646 MLT! (23 points, 132 comments)
    6. How to interact with TAs, discuss grades, performance, request exceptions... (18 points, 31 comments)
    7. assess_portfolio grades have been released (18 points, 34 comments)
    8. Midterm grades posted to T-Square (15 points, 30 comments)
    9. Removed posts (15 points, 2 comments)
    10. assess_portfolio IMPORTANT README: about sample frequency (13 points, 26 comments)
  3. 118 points, 17 submissions: yokh_cs7646
    1. Exam 2 Information (39 points, 40 comments)
    2. Reformat Assignment Pages? (14 points, 2 comments)
    3. What did the real-life Michael Burry have to say? (13 points, 2 comments)
    4. PSA: Read the Rubric carefully and ahead-of-time (8 points, 15 comments)
    5. How do I know that I'm correct and not just lucky? (7 points, 31 comments)
    6. ML Papers and News (7 points, 5 comments)
    7. What are "question pools"? (6 points, 4 comments)
    8. Explanation of "Regression" (5 points, 5 comments)
    9. GT Github taking FOREVER to push to..? (4 points, 14 comments)
    10. Dead links on the course wiki (3 points, 2 comments)
  4. 67 points, 13 submissions: harshsikka123
    1. To all those struggling, some words of courage! (20 points, 18 comments)
    2. Just got locked out of my apartment, am submitting from a stairwell (19 points, 12 comments)
    3. Thoroughly enjoying the lectures, some of the best I've seen! (13 points, 13 comments)
    4. Just for reference, how long did Assignment 1 take you all to implement? (3 points, 31 comments)
    5. Grade_Learners Taking about 7 seconds on Buffet vs 5 on Local, is this acceptable if all tests are passing? (2 points, 2 comments)
    6. Is anyone running into the Runtime Error, Invalid DISPLAY variable when trying to save the figures as pdfs to the Buffet servers? (2 points, 9 comments)
    7. Still not seeing an ML4T onboarding test on ProctorTrack (2 points, 10 comments)
    8. Any news on when Optimize_Something grades will be released? (1 point, 1 comment)
    9. Baglearner RMSE and leaf size? (1 point, 2 comments)
    10. My results are oh so slightly off, any thoughts? (1 point, 11 comments)
  5. 63 points, 10 submissions: htrajan
    1. Sample test case: missing data (22 points, 36 comments)
    2. Optimize_something test cases (13 points, 22 comments)
    3. Met Burt Malkiel today (6 points, 1 comment)
    4. Heads up: Dataframe.std != np.std (5 points, 5 comments)
    5. optimize_something: graph (5 points, 29 comments)
    6. Schedule still reflecting shortened summer timeframe? (4 points, 3 comments)
    7. Quick clarification about InsaneLearner (3 points, 8 comments)
    8. Test cases using rfr? (3 points, 5 comments)
    9. Input format of rfr (2 points, 1 comment)
    10. [Shameless recruiting post] Wealthfront is hiring! (0 points, 9 comments)
  6. 62 points, 7 submissions: swamijay
    1. defeat_learner test case (34 points, 38 comments)
    2. Project 3 test cases (15 points, 27 comments)
    3. Defeat_Learner - related questions (6 points, 9 comments)
    4. Options risk/reward (2 points, 0 comments)
    5. manual strategy - you must remain in the position for 21 trading days. (2 points, 9 comments)
    6. standardizing values (2 points, 0 comments)
    7. technical indicators - period for moving averages, or anything that looks past n days (1 point, 3 comments)
  7. 61 points, 9 submissions: gatech-raleighite
    1. Protip: Better reddit search (22 points, 9 comments)
    2. Helpful numpy array cheat sheet (16 points, 10 comments)
    3. In your experience Professor, Mr. Byrd, which strategy is "best" for trading ? (12 points, 10 comments)
    4. Industrial strength or mature versions of the assignments ? (4 points, 2 comments)
    5. What is the correct (faster) way of doing this bit of pandas code (updating multiple slice values) (2 points, 10 comments)
    6. What is the correct (pythonesque?) way to select 60% of rows ? (2 points, 11 comments)
    7. How to get adjusted close price for funds not publicly traded (TSP) ? (1 point, 2 comments)
    8. Is there a way to only test one or 2 of the learners using grade_learners.py ? (1 point, 10 comments)
    9. OMS CS Digital Career Seminar Series - Scott Leitstein recording available online? (1 point, 4 comments)
  8. 60 points, 2 submissions: reyallan
    1. [Project Questions] Unit Tests for assess_portfolio assignment (58 points, 52 comments)
    2. Financial data, technical indicators and live trading (2 points, 8 comments)
  9. 59 points, 12 submissions: dyllll
    1. Please upvote helpful posts and other advice. (26 points, 1 comment)
    2. Books to further study in trading with machine learning? (14 points, 9 comments)
    3. Is Q-Learning the best reinforcement learning method for stock trading? (4 points, 4 comments)
    4. Any way to download the lessons? (3 points, 4 comments)
    5. Can a TA please contact me? (2 points, 7 comments)
    6. Is the vectorization code from the youtube video available to us? (2 points, 2 comments)
    7. Position of webcam (2 points, 15 comments)
    8. Question about assignment one (2 points, 5 comments)
    9. Are udacity quizzes recorded? (1 point, 2 comments)
    10. Does normalization of indicators matter in a Q-Learner? (1 point, 7 comments)
  10. 56 points, 2 submissions: jan-laszlo
    1. Proper git workflow (43 points, 19 comments)
    2. Adding you SSH key for password-less access to remote hosts (13 points, 7 comments)
  11. 53 points, 1 submission: agifft3_omscs
    1. [Project Questions] Unit Tests for optimize_something assignment (53 points, 94 comments)
  12. 50 points, 16 submissions: BNielson
    1. Regression Trees (7 points, 9 comments)
    2. Two Interpretations of RFR are leading to two different possible Sharpe Ratios -- Need Instructor clarification ASAP (5 points, 3 comments)
    3. PYTHONPATH=../:. python grade_analysis.py (4 points, 7 comments)
    4. Running on Windows and PyCharm (4 points, 4 comments)
    5. Studying for the midterm: python questions (4 points, 0 comments)
    6. Assess Learners Grader (3 points, 2 comments)
    7. Manual Strategy Grade (3 points, 2 comments)
    8. Rewards in Q Learning (3 points, 3 comments)
    9. SSH/Putty on Windows (3 points, 4 comments)
    10. Slight contradiction on ProctorTrack Exam (3 points, 4 comments)
  13. 49 points, 7 submissions: j0shj0nes
    1. QLearning Robot - Finalized and Released Soon? (18 points, 4 comments)
    2. Flash Boys, HFT, frontrunning... (10 points, 3 comments)
    3. Deprecations / errata (7 points, 5 comments)
    4. Udacity lectures via GT account, versus personal account (6 points, 2 comments)
    5. Python: console-driven development (5 points, 5 comments)
    6. Buffet pandas / numpy versions (2 points, 2 comments)
    7. Quant research on earnings calls (1 point, 0 comments)
  14. 45 points, 11 submissions: Zapurza
    1. Suggestion for Strategy learner mega thread. (14 points, 1 comment)
    2. Which lectures to watch for upcoming project q learning robot? (7 points, 5 comments)
    3. In schedule file, there is no link against 'voting ensemble strategy'? Scheduled for Nov 13-20 week (6 points, 3 comments)
    4. How to add questions to the question bank? I can see there is 2% credit for that. (4 points, 5 comments)
    5. Scratch paper use (3 points, 6 comments)
    6. The big short movie link on you tube says the video is not available in your country. (3 points, 9 comments)
    7. Distance between training data date and future forecast date (2 points, 2 comments)
    8. News affecting stock market and machine learning algorithms (2 points, 4 comments)
    9. pandas import in pydev (2 points, 0 comments)
    10. Assess learner server error (1 point, 2 comments)
  15. 43 points, 23 submissions: chvbs2000
    1. Is the Strategy Learner finalized? (10 points, 3 comments)
    2. Test extra 15 test cases for marketsim (3 points, 12 comments)
    3. Confusion between the term computing "back-in time" and "going forward" (2 points, 1 comment)
    4. How to define "each transaction"? (2 points, 4 comments)
    5. How to filling the assignment into Jupyter Notebook? (2 points, 4 comments)
    6. IOError: File ../data/SPY.csv does not exist (2 points, 4 comments)
    7. Issue in Access to machines at Georgia Tech via MacOS terminal (2 points, 5 comments)
    8. Reading data from Jupyter Notebook (2 points, 3 comments)
    9. benchmark vs manual strategy vs best possible strategy (2 points, 2 comments)
    10. global name 'pd' is not defined (2 points, 4 comments)
  16. 43 points, 15 submissions: shuang379
    1. How to test my code on buffet machine? (10 points, 15 comments)
    2. Can we get the ppt for "Decision Trees"? (8 points, 2 comments)
    3. python question pool question (5 points, 6 comments)
    4. set up problems (3 points, 4 comments)
    5. Do I need another camera for scanning? (2 points, 9 comments)
    6. Is chapter 9 covered by the midterm? (2 points, 2 comments)
    7. Why grade_analysis.py could run even if I rm analysis.py? (2 points, 5 comments)
    8. python question pool No.48 (2 points, 6 comments)
    9. where could we find old versions of the rest projects? (2 points, 2 comments)
    10. where to put ml4t-libraries to install those libraries? (2 points, 1 comment)
  17. 42 points, 14 submissions: larrva
    1. is there a mistake in How-to-learn-a-decision-tree.pdf (7 points, 7 comments)
    2. maximum recursion depth problem (6 points, 10 comments)
    3. [Urgent]Unable to use proctortrack in China (4 points, 21 comments)
    4. manual_strategynumber of indicators to use (3 points, 10 comments)
    5. Assignment 2: Got 63 points. (3 points, 3 comments)
    6. Software installation workshop (3 points, 7 comments)
    7. question regarding functools32 version (3 points, 3 comments)
    8. workshop on Aug 31 (3 points, 8 comments)
    9. Mount remote server to local machine (2 points, 2 comments)
    10. any suggestion on objective function (2 points, 3 comments)
  18. 41 points, 8 submissions: Ran__Ran
    1. Any resource will be available for final exam? (19 points, 6 comments)
    2. Need clarification on size of X, Y in defeat_learners (7 points, 10 comments)
    3. Get the same date format as in example chart (4 points, 3 comments)
    4. Cannot log in GitHub Desktop using GT account? (3 points, 3 comments)
    5. Do we have notes or ppt for Time Series Data? (3 points, 5 comments)
    6. Can we know the commission & market impact for short example? (2 points, 7 comments)
    7. Course schedule export issue (2 points, 15 comments)
    8. Buying/seeking beta v.s. buying/seeking alpha (1 point, 6 comments)
  19. 38 points, 4 submissions: ProudRamblinWreck
    1. Exam 2 Study topics (21 points, 5 comments)
    2. Reddit participation as part of grade? (13 points, 32 comments)
    3. Will birds chirping in the background flag me on Proctortrack? (3 points, 5 comments)
    4. Midterm Study Guide question pools (1 point, 2 comments)
  20. 37 points, 6 submissions: gatechben
    1. Submission page for strategy learner? (14 points, 10 comments)
    2. PSA: The grading script for strategy_learner changed on the 26th (10 points, 9 comments)
    3. Where is util.py supposed to be located? (8 points, 8 comments)
    4. PSA:. The default dates in the assignment 1 template are not the same as the examples on the assignment page. (2 points, 1 comment)
    5. Schedule: Discussion of upcoming trading projects? (2 points, 3 comments)
    6. [defeat_learners] More than one column for X? (1 point, 1 comment)
  21. 37 points, 3 submissions: jgeiger
    1. Please send/announce when changes are made to the project code (23 points, 7 comments)
    2. The Big Short on Netflix for OMSCS students (week of 10/16) (11 points, 6 comments)
    3. Typo(?) for Assess_portfolio wiki page (3 points, 2 comments)
  22. 35 points, 10 submissions: ltian35
    1. selecting row using .ix (8 points, 9 comments)
    2. Will the following 2 topics be included in the final exam(online student)? (7 points, 4 comments)
    3. udacity quiz (7 points, 4 comments)
    4. pdf of lecture (3 points, 4 comments)
    5. print friendly version of the course schedule (3 points, 9 comments)
    6. about learner regression vs classificaiton (2 points, 2 comments)
    7. is there a simple way to verify the correctness of our decision tree (2 points, 4 comments)
    8. about Building an ML-based forex strategy (1 point, 2 comments)
    9. about technical analysis (1 point, 6 comments)
    10. final exam online time period (1 point, 2 comments)
  23. 33 points, 2 submissions: bhrolenok
    1. Assess learners template and grading script is now available in the public repository (24 points, 0 comments)
    2. Tutorial for software setup on Windows (9 points, 35 comments)
  24. 31 points, 4 submissions: johannes_92
    1. Deadline extension? (26 points, 40 comments)
    2. Pandas date indexing issues (2 points, 5 comments)
    3. Why do we subtract 1 from SMA calculation? (2 points, 3 comments)
    4. Unexpected number of calls to query, sum=20 (should be 20), max=20 (should be 1), min=20 (should be 1) -bash: syntax error near unexpected token `(' (1 point, 3 comments)
  25. 30 points, 5 submissions: log_base_pi
    1. The Massive Hedge Fund Betting on AI [Article] (9 points, 1 comment)
    2. Useful Python tips and tricks (8 points, 10 comments)
    3. Video of overview of remaining projects with Tucker Balch (7 points, 1 comment)
    4. Will any material from the lecture by Goldman Sachs be covered on the exam? (5 points, 1 comment)
    5. What will the 2nd half of the course be like? (1 point, 8 comments)
  26. 30 points, 4 submissions: acschwabe
    1. Assignment and Exam Calendar (ICS File) (17 points, 6 comments)
    2. Please OMG give us any options for extra credit (8 points, 12 comments)
    3. Strategy learner question (3 points, 1 comment)
    4. Proctortrack: Do we need to schedule our test time? (2 points, 10 comments)
  27. 29 points, 9 submissions: _ant0n_
    1. Next assignment? (9 points, 6 comments)
    2. Proctortrack Onboarding test? (6 points, 11 comments)
    3. Manual strategy: Allowable positions (3 points, 7 comments)
    4. Anyone watched Black Scholes documentary? (2 points, 16 comments)
    5. Buffet machines hardware (2 points, 6 comments)
    6. Defeat learners: clarification (2 points, 4 comments)
    7. Is 'optimize_something' on the way to class GitHub repo? (2 points, 6 comments)
    8. assess_portfolio(... gen_plot=True) (2 points, 8 comments)
    9. remote job != remote + international? (1 point, 15 comments)
  28. 26 points, 10 submissions: umersaalis
    1. comments.txt (7 points, 6 comments)
    2. Assignment 2: report.pdf (6 points, 30 comments)
    3. Assignment 2: report.pdf sharing & plagiarism (3 points, 12 comments)
    4. Max Recursion Limit (3 points, 10 comments)
    5. Parametric vs Non-Parametric Model (3 points, 13 comments)
    6. Bag Learner Training (1 point, 2 comments)
    7. Decision Tree Issue: (1 point, 2 comments)
    8. Error in Running DTLearner and RTLearner (1 point, 12 comments)
    9. My Results for the four learners. Please check if you guys are getting values somewhat near to these. Exact match may not be there due to randomization. (1 point, 4 comments)
    10. Can we add the assignments and solutions to our public github profile? (0 points, 7 comments)
  29. 26 points, 6 submissions: abiele
    1. Recommended Reading? (13 points, 1 comment)
    2. Number of Indicators Used by Actual Trading Systems (7 points, 6 comments)
    3. Software Install Instructions From TA's Video Not Working (2 points, 2 comments)
    4. Suggest that TA/Instructor Contact Info Should be Added to the Syllabus (2 points, 2 comments)
    5. ML4T Software Setup (1 point, 3 comments)
    6. Where can I find the grading folder? (1 point, 4 comments)
  30. 26 points, 6 submissions: tomatonight
    1. Do we have all the information needed to finish the last project Strategy learner? (15 points, 3 comments)
    2. Does anyone interested in cryptocurrency trading/investing/others? (3 points, 6 comments)
    3. length of portfolio daily return (3 points, 2 comments)
    4. Did Michael Burry, Jamie&Charlie enter the short position too early? (2 points, 4 comments)
    5. where to check participation score (2 points, 1 comment)
    6. Where to collect the midterm exam? (forgot to take it last week) (1 point, 3 comments)
  31. 26 points, 3 submissions: hilo260
    1. Is there a template for optimize_something on GitHub? (14 points, 3 comments)
    2. Marketism project? (8 points, 6 comments)
    3. "Do not change the API" (4 points, 7 comments)
  32. 26 points, 3 submissions: niufen
    1. Windows Server Setup Guide (23 points, 16 comments)
    2. Strategy Learner Adding UserID as Comment (2 points, 2 comments)
    3. Connect to server via Python Error (1 point, 6 comments)
  33. 26 points, 3 submissions: whoyoung99
    1. How much time you spend on Assess Learner? (13 points, 47 comments)
    2. Git clone repository without fork (8 points, 2 comments)
    3. Just for fun (5 points, 1 comment)
  34. 25 points, 8 submissions: SharjeelHanif
    1. When can we discuss defeat learners methods? (10 points, 1 comment)
    2. Are the buffet servers really down? (3 points, 2 comments)
    3. Are the midterm results in proctortrack gone? (3 points, 3 comments)
    4. Will these finance topics be covered on the final? (3 points, 9 comments)
    5. Anyone get set up with Proctortrack? (2 points, 10 comments)
    6. Incentives Quiz Discussion (2-01, Lesson 11.8) (2 points, 3 comments)
    7. Anyone from Houston, TX (1 point, 1 comment)
    8. How can I trace my error back to a line of code? (assess learners) (1 point, 3 comments)
  35. 25 points, 5 submissions: jlamberts3
    1. Conda vs VirtualEnv (7 points, 8 comments)
    2. Cool Portfolio Backtesting Tool (6 points, 6 comments)
    3. Warren Buffett wins $1M bet made a decade ago that the S&P 500 stock index would outperform hedge funds (6 points, 12 comments)
    4. Windows Ubuntu Subsystem Putty Alternative (4 points, 0 comments)
    5. Algorithmic Trading Of Digital Assets (2 points, 0 comments)
  36. 25 points, 4 submissions: suman_paul
    1. Grade statistics (9 points, 3 comments)
    2. Machine Learning book by Mitchell (6 points, 11 comments)
    3. Thank You (6 points, 6 comments)
    4. Assignment1 ready to be cloned? (4 points, 4 comments)
  37. 25 points, 3 submissions: Spareo
    1. Submit Assignments Function (OS X/Linux) (15 points, 6 comments)
    2. Quantsoftware Site down? (8 points, 38 comments)
    3. ML4T_2017Spring folder on Buffet server?? (2 points, 5 comments)
  38. 24 points, 14 submissions: nelsongcg
    1. Is it realistic for us to try to build our own trading bot and profit? (6 points, 21 comments)
    2. Is the risk free rate zero for any country? (3 points, 7 comments)
    3. Models and black swans - discussion (3 points, 0 comments)
    4. Normal distribution assumption for options pricing (2 points, 3 comments)
    5. Technical analysis for cryptocurrency market? (2 points, 4 comments)
    6. A counter argument to models by Nassim Taleb (1 point, 0 comments)
    7. Are we demandas to use the sample for part 1? (1 point, 1 comment)
    8. Benchmark for "trusting" your trading algorithm (1 point, 5 comments)
    9. Don't these two statements on the project description contradict each other? (1 point, 2 comments)
    10. Forgot my TA (1 point, 6 comments)
  39. 24 points, 11 submissions: nurobezede
    1. Best way to obtain survivor bias free stock data (8 points, 1 comment)
    2. Please confirm Midterm is from October 13-16 online with proctortrack. (5 points, 2 comments)
    3. Are these DTlearner Corr values good? (2 points, 6 comments)
    4. Testing gen_data.py (2 points, 3 comments)
    5. BagLearner of Baglearners says 'Object is not callable' (1 point, 8 comments)
    6. DTlearner training RMSE none zero but almost there (1 point, 2 comments)
    7. How to submit analysis using git and confirm it? (1 point, 2 comments)
    8. Passing kwargs to learners in a BagLearner (1 point, 5 comments)
    9. Sampling for bagging tree (1 point, 8 comments)
    10. code failing the 18th test with grade_learners.py (1 point, 6 comments)
  40. 24 points, 4 submissions: AeroZach
    1. questions about how to build a machine learning system that's going to work well in a real market (12 points, 6 comments)
    2. Survivor Bias Free Data (7 points, 5 comments)
    3. Genetic Algorithms for Feature selection (3 points, 5 comments)
    4. How far back can you train? (2 points, 2 comments)
  41. 23 points, 9 submissions: vsrinath6
    1. Participation check #3 - Haven't seen it yet (5 points, 5 comments)
    2. What are the tasks for this week? (5 points, 12 comments)
    3. No projects until after the mid-term? (4 points, 5 comments)
    4. Format / Syllabus for the exams (2 points, 3 comments)
    5. Has there been a Participation check #4? (2 points, 8 comments)
    6. Project 3 not visible on T-Square (2 points, 3 comments)
    7. Assess learners - do we need to check is method implemented for BagLearner? (1 point, 4 comments)
    8. Correct number of days reported in the dataframe (should be the number of trading days between the start date and end date, inclusive). (1 point, 0 comments)
    9. RuntimeError: Invalid DISPLAY variable (1 point, 2 comments)
  42. 23 points, 8 submissions: nick_algorithm
    1. Help with getting Average Daily Return Right (6 points, 7 comments)
    2. Hint for args argument in scipy minimize (5 points, 2 comments)
    3. How do you make money off of highly volatile (high SDDR) stocks? (4 points, 5 comments)
    4. Can We Use Code Obtained from Class To Make Money without Fear of Being Sued (3 points, 6 comments)
    5. Is the Std for Bollinger Bands calculated over the same timespan of the Moving Average? (2 points, 2 comments)
    6. Can't run grade_learners.py but I'm not doing anything different from the last assignment (?) (1 point, 5 comments)
    7. How to determine value at terminal node of tree? (1 point, 1 comment)
    8. Is there a way to get Reddit announcements piped to email (or have a subsequent T-Square announcement published simultaneously) (1 point, 2 comments)
  43. 23 points, 1 submission: gong6
    1. Is manual strategy ready? (23 points, 6 comments)
  44. 21 points, 6 submissions: amchang87
    1. Reason for public reddit? (6 points, 4 comments)
    2. Manual Strategy - 21 day holding Period (4 points, 12 comments)
    3. Sharpe Ratio (4 points, 6 comments)
    4. Manual Strategy - No Position? (3 points, 3 comments)
    5. ML / Manual Trader Performance (2 points, 0 comments)
    6. T-Square Submission Missing? (2 points, 3 comments)
  45. 21 points, 6 submissions: fall2017_ml4t_cs_god
    1. PSA: When typing in code, please use 'formatting help' to see how to make the code read cleaner. (8 points, 2 comments)
    2. Why do Bollinger Bands use 2 standard deviations? (5 points, 20 comments)
    3. How do I log into the [email protected]? (3 points, 1 comment)
    4. Is midterm 2 cumulative? (2 points, 3 comments)
    5. Where can we learn about options? (2 points, 2 comments)
    6. How do you calculate the analysis statistics for bps and manual strategy? (1 point, 1 comment)
  46. 21 points, 5 submissions: Jmitchell83
    1. Manual Strategy Grades (12 points, 9 comments)
    2. two-factor (3 points, 6 comments)
    3. Free to use volume? (2 points, 1 comment)
    4. Is MC1-Project-1 different than assess_portfolio? (2 points, 2 comments)
    5. Online Participation Checks (2 points, 4 comments)
  47. 21 points, 5 submissions: Sergei_B
    1. Do we need to worry about missing data for Asset Portfolio? (14 points, 13 comments)
    2. How do you get data from yahoo in panda? the sample old code is below: (2 points, 3 comments)
    3. How to fix import pandas as pd ImportError: No module named pandas? (2 points, 4 comments)
    4. Python Practice exam Question 48 (2 points, 2 comments)
    5. Mac: "virtualenv : command not found" (1 point, 2 comments)
  48. 21 points, 3 submissions: mharrow3
    1. First time reddit user .. (17 points, 37 comments)
    2. Course errors/types (2 points, 2 comments)
    3. Install course software on macOS using Vagrant .. (2 points, 0 comments)
  49. 20 points, 9 submissions: iceguyvn
    1. Manual strategy implementation for future projects (4 points, 15 comments)
    2. Help with correlation calculation (3 points, 15 comments)
    3. Help! maximum recursion depth exceeded (3 points, 10 comments)
    4. Help: how to index by date? (2 points, 4 comments)
    5. How to attach a 1D array to a 2D array? (2 points, 2 comments)
    6. How to set a single cell in a 2D DataFrame? (2 points, 4 comments)
    7. Next assignment after marketsim? (2 points, 4 comments)
    8. Pythonic way to detect the first row? (1 point, 6 comments)
    9. Questions regarding seed (1 point, 1 comment)
  50. 20 points, 3 submissions: JetsonDavis
    1. Push back assignment 3? (10 points, 14 comments)
    2. Final project (9 points, 3 comments)
    3. Numpy versions (1 point, 2 comments)
  51. 20 points, 2 submissions: pharmerino
    1. assess_portfolio test cases (16 points, 88 comments)
    2. ML4T Assignments (4 points, 6 comments)

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  90. gatech-raleighite (42 points, 30 comments)
  91. chrisong2017 (41 points, 26 comments)
  92. ProudRamblinWreck (41 points, 24 comments)
  93. kramey8 (41 points, 24 comments)
  94. coderafk (40 points, 28 comments)
  95. niufen (40 points, 23 comments)
  96. tholladay3 (40 points, 23 comments)
  97. SaberCrunch (40 points, 22 comments)
  98. gnr11 (40 points, 21 comments)
  99. nadav3 (40 points, 18 comments)
  100. gt7431a (40 points, 16 comments)

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  2. [Project Questions] Unit Tests for optimize_something assignment by agifft3_omscs (53 points, 94 comments)
  3. Proper git workflow by jan-laszlo (43 points, 19 comments)
  4. Exam 2 Information by yokh_cs7646 (39 points, 40 comments)
  5. A little more on Pandas indexing/slicing ([] vs ix vs iloc vs loc) and numpy shapes by davebyrd (37 points, 10 comments)
  6. Project 1 Megathread (assess_portfolio) by davebyrd (34 points, 466 comments)
  7. defeat_learner test case by swamijay (34 points, 38 comments)
  8. Project 2 Megathread (optimize_something) by tuckerbalch (33 points, 475 comments)
  9. project 3 megathread (assess_learners) by tuckerbalch (27 points, 1130 comments)
  10. Deadline extension? by johannes_92 (26 points, 40 comments)

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